Lifestyle Magazine - Bald Eagles of Wolf Lodge Bay
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Bald Eagles of Wolf Lodge Bay Seven miles southeast of Coeur d’Alene is Wolf Lodge Bay, a well-known migrating spot for bald eagles. It’s believed they come down from Canada for a milder climate
  Bald eagle pairs rarely get within a mile of each other. So wouldn’t it be neat to stumble onto dozens of them, together in the wild? To watch them glide from their perch tree, spiral toward the water and pluck a fish from its depths? Well, snuggle down and start reading. You’re about to find out where and when you can find such a sight.

Bald eagle pairs rarely get within a mile of each other. In Sandpoint Idaho The eagles start arriving in mid-November, rising in numbers to peak around the holiday season. They start leaving in mid-January

  Seven miles southeast of Coeur d’Alene is Wolf Lodge Bay, a well-known migrating spot for bald eagles. It’s believed they come down from Canada for a milder climate
and make the bay their winter home. The rocky shores, submerged gravel beds, and tall trees lure the eagles because it’s the ideal habitat for kokanee salmon, a main food source. The area is chock-full of the land-locked
The Bureau of Land Management together with the Department of Fish & Game started the Watchable Wildlife Program. One portion of that program is the Coeur d ’Alene Eagle Watch at Wolf Lodge Bay started in 1991. It’s a public showing of the eagles, with wildlife personnel around to answer questions and direct you to the best spots to find them at any given timesalmon, which spawn around November, then die and become the perfect food to get the eagles through the winter.

 

  The Bureau of Land Management together with the Department of Fish & Game started the Watchable Wildlife Program. One portion of that program is the Coeur d ’Alene Eagle Watch at Wolf Lodge Bay started in 1991. It’s a public showing of the eagles, with wildlife personnel around to answer questions and direct you to the best spots to find them at any given time.

  “It’s grown from one Saturday in December to the seven days from Christmas to New Year’s Day,” says Scott Robinson, a wildlife biologist with the Bureau of Land Management in Coeur d’Alene.

If you’d like to watch the bald eagles fish, get there early. They usually start just after dawn and slow around mid-morning. They position themselves in perch trees near the edge of the water and watch for dead or dying salmon. They swoop down in a spiraling motion, snatch the fish out of the water and take it back to their perch to eat

  “There are an assortment of government people and volunteers who set up telescopes, displays and handout material. We assist the public in viewing and enjoying the bald eagles.”

  The eagles start arriving in mid-November, rising in numbers to peak around the holiday season. They start leaving in mid-January.

  “During the one-week period at Christmas, we have anywhere from 2,000 to 4,000 visitors sign our guest book,” said Robinson. “Seventy percent are from within a three-hour driving distance, and the other thirty percent are from everywhere else.”

  Idaho Department of Fish & Game have documented visitors from all fifty states and Washington, D.C. The number of bald eagles that show up at Wolf Lodge Bay varies from year to year but has increased to between eighty and one hundred during the month of December.

  If you think you’d like to see Wolf Lodge Bay in December, here are a few tips from the Bureau of Land Management. It is seven miles southeast of Coeur d’Alene on I-90. The suggested viewing spots are on Highway 97 at Higgins Point, Mineral Ridge Boat Ramp and Mineral Ridge Trail head.

  Don’t forget your binoculars and camera with a zoom lens. Officials ask that you don’t get too close to the birds or their perch trees. If the eagles start to ruffle their feathers or appear agitated, you’re too close. If made too uncomfortable they will fly off.

  If you’d like to watch the bald eagles fish, get there early. They usually start just after dawn and slow around mid-morning. They position themselves in perch trees near the edge of the water and watch for dead or dying salmon. They swoop down in a spiraling motion, snatch the fish out of the water and take it back to their perch to eat.

  It’s a rare and wonderful chance to see so many bald eagles in one place. Isn’t North Idaho great?

Bald Eagle Facts Bald eagles mate for life and can live 60 years in captivity and are only found in north america. eighty percent of bald eagles die before their first birthday due to predators nd the lack of food. If you get caught with even one bald eagle feather, you can be fined up to $5000 and spend a year in prison. Aves Falconiformes Accipitridae Haliaeetus (sea eagle) leucocephalus (white head) Size: 1 m (3 ft.) in height; 2.3 m (7 ft.) wing span Weight: males 3.5 to 4 kg (8-9 lb.), females 4.5 to 6 kg (10-14 lb.) Description: Adults at 4 to 5 yrs. are identified by their white head and tail, solid brown body, and large, curved, yellow bill. Juveniles have blotchy patches of white on their underside and tail. Life span: up to 30 years in the wild, longer in captivity Sexual maturity: 4 to 5 years of age Incubation: 31 to 45 days Habitat: live and nest near coastlines, rivers, lakes, wet prairies, and coastal pine lands in North America from Alaska and Canada south into Florida and Baja, California. Diet: prefer fish swimming close to the water's surface, small mammals, waterfowl, wading birds, dead animal matter (carrion). Status: listed by USFWS as threatened in all but three of the lower 48 states and protected by CITES; populations are healthy in Alaska Fun Facts 1. The bald eagle is not really bald; it actually has white feathers on its head, neck, and tail. Bald is a derivation of balde, an Old English word meaning white. The eagle was named for its white feathers instead for a lack of feathers. 2. Bald eagles may use the same nest year after year, adding more twigs and branches each time. One nest was found that had been used for 34 years and weighed over two tons! 3. The bald eagle can fly 20 to 40 mph in normal flight and can dive at speeds over 100 mph. 4. Bald eagles can actually swim! They use an overhand movement of the wings that is very much like the butterfly stroke. 5. More than 80% of the bald eagle population in the southeastern United States is concentrated within the state of Florida. Ecology and Conservation Bald eagles are a very important part of the environment. By eating dead animal matter, they help with nature's clean-up process. Bald eagles are also hunters, so they keep animal populations strong. They do this by killing weak, old, and slower animls, leaving only the healthiest to survive. The bald eagle is our national symbol, so when it became threatened with extinction in the 1960s due to pesticide use, habitat loss, and other problems created by humans, people took notice. For years the bald eagle was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Now the number of bald eagles has increased so much that in June, 1994 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed that they be downgraded from endangered status to the less urgent status of threatened in all but three of the lower 48 states. The success of the bald eagle is a tribute to the Endangered Species Act and is an incentive for increased awareness and conservation everywhere.

Bald Eagles of North Idaho

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